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Firearms

EDC Gun Review – Sig P238

sigA few months back, I decided that I wanted to upgrade my EDC off-duty carry pistol. At the time, I had a Smith and Wesson Bodyguard. And while it was a decent, quality firearm, I did not like the LONG trigger pull. So I decided I wanted to make a change. Off to my favorite gun store I went.

After looking at a few, I picked up the Sig Sauer P238, and immediately fell in love. The P238 is a metal framed 1911 in miniature, (minus the grip safety), chambered in .380. It fit perfectly into my hand (with the flared 7 round mag…see picture) with an overall width of about 1’1” with a 2.7’’ barrel. As for weight, it is about 15 oz. unloaded.

The pistol comes with a 6 round magazine, but I purchased an additional 7 rounder with a flared bottom plate. (I would recommend this mag to anyone buying this firearm.)

I went to a local gun range, where I was able to rent the P238. The guy behind the counter lent me a 7 round, flared mag. From the very first trigger pull, I knew this gun was for me. The trigger was fluid and so SMOOTH, at maybe 5 lb pull.

The P238 is single action, meaning that the hammer must be cocked in the rear position. The safety is a bit strong, but that means it won’t accidentally be flipped off. There is a noticeable “click” when engaging the safety on and off. You will also notice the feel when doing so. Hence there won’t be any confusion when flipping the safety on and off. You WILL hear it and feel it!

I practiced quite a bit, drawing from a holstered position while disengaging the safety. The safety flips off easily, though flipping the safety back on takes a bit of practice as it was a little stiff at first.

Speaking of holsters, the P238 does come with a Sig hard case OWB concealment holster. I thought it was a nice touch, but ended up not using it. It rode a bit high on my waist for my liking. I also felt like I wanted a concealment holster that was a bit more secure and stable.
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Prepper Budget Rifle Review – S&W M&P 15 Sport

m&psport, prepper rifle, beginner AR, budget AR,The AR-15 is the most popular sporting/military style rifle sold in the US. Millions have been sold over the past several years, and that number continues to grow.

As the popularity of the AR platform increases, so have the number of manufacturers. For those who are new to prepping or firearms, trying to find a decent quality AR on a budget can be tricky. And to those people, Smith and Wesson introduced the M&P 15 Sport model rifle.

The first things to note on this rifle is that it lacks a dust cover or a forward assist. (The dust cover is the metal plate covering your rifle’s ejection port when the rifle is not in use. See the picture below.) Smith and Wesson, in an effort to make the rifle more affordable, left these items off of the Sport model.

Personally engraved dust cover

Personally engraved dust cover

For the AR enthusiast, this might immediately turn them off from this gun. But realistically, unless you plan on crawling around on your belly, the dust cover really isn’t essential. As long as you store your rifle in a cool, dry place and keep it clean, you should be fine without one.

As for the forward assist, I put anywhere from 700-900 rounds through this rifle without a single hiccup. Never once did I have a “failure to feed” or a “failure to extract” problem with the Sport model.

There are mixed emotions about the need of the forward assist. Personally, I like having one, but to be honest I have never used it. Considering that I owned the Sport model and put well over 700 rounds through it without a problem, I’d say not having a forward assist was a “non-issue.”
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Firearms Training – It is a MUST!

20150320_152831A few weeks ago, I answered an email to Prepper Pam about firearms practice and training. I got a few more emails in response, so I thought the topic important enough to write an article on it.

Her initial question was:

I recently just bought a new pistol. I’ve shot it some and it’s a lot of fun. What sort of training do you recommend? – Prepper Pam

This was my response:

Congratulations! It is always fun when you purchase a new gun. I’m always excited when I shoot that very first round through it.

When it comes to firearms training, I would say train as often as you can. Make time if you have to. And not just range time. At home, I would practice (with your firearm unloaded of course) things like drawing it from where you carry it, (purse, concealed on hip, etc), sight alignment, trigger pull, etc. If your pistol has a safety, I would practice switching it off while drawing it. Practice those things all in conjunction.

Doctor Richard Schmidt wrote a book called Performance and Motor Control And Learning. In it, he states that it takes around 300-500 repetitions to develop a new motor pattern. However, once a bad or inadequate habit is already in place, it takes about 3,000-5,000 repetitions to erase and correct that bad motor pattern. (So train right the first time.)

When you go to the range, vary the length of your target from yourself. Shoot at 5 yards, 10 yards, and 15 yards for example. (Much longer ranges with a long gun of course.) Don’t lock yourself in to the same distance from your target every time.

As your experience grows, change things up. Give yourself time limits, ie 3 shots center mass from a holstered position in 3 seconds. Try to put a bit of pressure on yourself. If you ever find yourself in a life or death situation, your physiological reactions to the stressful event can alter the way you shoot, ie elevated heart rate, tunnel vision, etc. So putting a little bit of stress on your body now will begin to prepare you should that ever happen.
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EDC Budget Gun Review – Sccy CPX-2 9mm

Sccy CPX-2, EDC gun, carry and conceal

Bullets sold separately

About a month ago, one of my best friends at work hit me up about purchasing his backup weapon, the Sccy CPX-2 , which is a 9mm. I normally would not have a need for this pistol, and would not have purchased it on my own. I already have a backup/off duty gun that I really enjoy. And I do not have any firearms in 9mm. (For pistol I stock .40 cal, .380, and some .357.)

But I knew he needed the money, and he was offering me a VERY fair price. So I purchased it from him thinking I would keep it until he wanted to buy it back. When I mentioned that to him a few days later, he replied that when he did eventually buy a new backup gun, he would go with something different.

So I am now the proud, permanent owner of a Sccy CPX-2.

At this point, I started thinking that maybe I could trade it in for something else. I could at least get out of it what I had in it.

I also wondered if it wouldn’t make a decent weapon for someone in my group. We don’t have any 9mm ammo, but what if we came across some if things went really bad? 100 rounds of 9mm ammo isn’t that expensive, and it might be a pistol I could give to a family member if “things go south”.

Either way, I decided to do a review on this pistol for folks who might want an EDC pistol without breaking the bank. The MSRP on the gun is $319, which means from a reputable dealer you could probably find it for around $250-$270. A used one might be even cheaper.
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EDC Gun Review – Smith and Wesson .380 Bodyguard

bodyguardSome might call me a “Gun Nut”. I prefer the term “Firearm Aficionado!” But I thought I would combine my love of firearms with my love of writing and blogging. So to begin this endeavor, I decided I would start with a review of my old backup, off-duty, EDC pistol; the .380 Bodyguard by Smith and Wesson.

I purchased the Bodyguard wanting a backup pistol for my Glock 23 as well as something I could easily carry off-duty. I looked for something light weight and easily concealable. The S&W Bodyguard fit that bill. The fact that it had a built in laser sight by Insight was a bonus.

The laser is activated with a button on both sides of the gun frame. You hit the button for on, again for pulse, and a third time for off.

The Bodyguard is a hammer fired, double action semi-automatic pistol. The slide is stainless steel and coated in Melonite, while the lower frame is polymer. It came with a single, 6 round magazine with a flared bottom plate for better gripping ability.  (Gun has a 6 +1 capacity.)

The barrel on this gun is 2.75 inches, with the total length of the gun at 5.4’ and weighs about 12 oz.
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Firearms for Preppers Part II – SHTF

planandprepared, firearms for preppersThis is Part II of Firearms for Preppers series. Be sure to check out Part I if you missed it!

In my article Firearms for Beginners, I talk in general about needing at minimum, one long gun and one pistol for a long term survival scenario. The long gun you can use to hunt and to defend yourself at range, while the pistol is a great backup weapon and is many times better suited to self-defense in very close quarters.

But now I want to go into a bit more detail. I want to be a bit more specific. Of course, a lot of what you need depends upon your situation. And that could vary greatly from person to person. But overall, much of what I say will apply to everyone regardless of their situation.

Ok….so you need a long gun and a pistol for a long term disaster scenario. But what kind of pistol? What kind of long gun? Should you stop with just two or gather more? Well, let’s discuss that.

I have seen many articles from various prepper sources taking it a bit further, saying you need a good rifle, a shotgun, and a pistol. Some even go further and say that in addition to those you also need a .22 rifle as well. A few will even say that you need backups of all of those. I cannot argue with any of that logic as I subscribe to it myself. If you have the funds available, then I would absolutely tell you to go that route.

Now I know my situation. I know what my long term plans are. You need to acquire firearms based upon what your plans are should you find yourself in a long term survival situation.

Are you bugging in or bugging out? How many people are in your group? How well trained are these folks? These are questions only you can answer. But to give you some ideas, I’ll give you some examples based upon my plans.

I live in a large suburb of Oklahoma City. So I have firearms for self-defense based upon a city setting. I prefer a pistol and shotgun for urban use. Yet if I had to bug out, I have a rural homestead on several acres I can go to. I have firearms (rifles) I could use in a self-defense scenario in a rural setting as well.
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