Chance favors the prepared!

Firearms

6 things to consider when buying a rifle optic

From time to time I get emails asking about rifle optics. It’s a great question I enjoy discussing. To answer that question, there are several different factors that need to go into the decision-making process. I thought I’d take a look 6 factors that you need to consider when purchasing an optic for your rifle.

1. What type of rifle do you have? What’s the purpose of the rifle?

Because there are so many rifles out there that can serve multiple functions, you need to decide what the primary purpose of your rifle is. Is it for hunting? For self-defense? Truck gun?

Having the right optic on the right rifle for the right mission will be critical. A 1x reflex site won’t be very effective for hunting. Hence you won’t ever see one on a bolt-action rifle. On the flip side, a 3×15 scope is not your best choice for home defense and close quarter combat situations (CQB). Once you decide what your rifle’s primary function will be, then deciding what sort of optic you need becomes easier.

2. What reticle is right for you?

There are a wide range of reticles on the market these days. So when shopping for an optic, you should think about what reticle will best serve your needs.

Optics have grown from simple crosshairs to much more complex designs to meet user demands. Some optics will still have fairly simple patterns. Others offer more complex options to help with windage and elevation. Some of the higher end optics will have reticles that will aid with things such as bullet drop. (See video below)

You’ll need to consider whether you want hash marks for holdover or illumination in your reticle as well. A lot of this comes down to personal preference. So certainly review and test the various reticles on the market. Find the one you like and fits your needs before dropping your hard-earned cash on an optic.
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9 firearm training tips to help you survive a deadly encounter

A while back, I received an email from a guy asking me my opinions on various firearms. The guy had some money to spend, and wanted to know what sort of rifle he should buy. He said he was new to rifles and was asking for my insight. His budget was on the higher end, between $1500 to $2000 according to his email. My response may have caught him off guard.

I told the man NOT to spend more than $1000 on the rifle. I talked about a few solid rifles that were under $1000. Then I told him to take the rest of the money, and spend it on training. (Getting several magazines and ammo as well is something I stressed.) I explained that a $1000 (or less) rifle in the hands of a trained shooter is head and shoulders better than a $2000 rifle in the hands of a novice. The shooter makes the rifle, the rifle doesn’t make the shooter!

When it comes to firearm training, there are many reputable instructors out there. They can give you a one day, two-day, or even longer classes to teach you more than just the fundamentals of shooting. However, many of these classes can be pretty pricey….costing hundreds of dollars or more. (That doesn’t include any travel expenses, the cost of providing your own ammo, etc.) So for many people, the ability to take classes like these may be cost prohibitive.

However, that does not mean you cannot train on your own. I have advocated multiple times on this site the importance of firearm training. Unlike riding a bike, firearms skills can go rusty if you do not do it regularly. In addition, simply shooting at paper targets 3 to 7 yards away is great for beginners. But just like any other skill, you need to push yourself for that skill to improve.

So with that in mind, I thought I would take a look at some training tips that can help you be more prepared should you ever have an encounter where you have to use lethal force to protect yourself/your family.
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AR Wheeler Trigger Guard Install Tool Review

Wheeler Trigger Guard Tool

Editor’s note: Please welcome Evail Juan to Planandprepared.com. He will be a regular here, providing reviews on firearms, firearm accessories and tools, as well as other prepper related gear.

I recently received a Magpul Enhanced Trigger Guard as a gift (Thanks Sis). But upon reading how to change it out from the Mil Spec guard, I was shocked to learn the suggested method was to get an armorers block, roll pin punch, and a mallet to hammer the pins out. That being said, there is a disclaimer that should read “If you break the tab off, your lower will be JUNK!”

In this day and age why wouldn’t there be an easier way to change this out without the chance of destroying the lower receiver? Enter the Wheeler Trigger Guard Installation Tool. This tool is basically a specialized C-Clamp with 2 rods included. The long rod is for the removal, while the short rod is for the install. I actually read the directions carefully, which were precise and to the point.

Get ammo of your choice delivered right to your door!

The removal and install took about 30 minutes to complete. The only reason that took a little longer than expected was because I aligning the pin and install tool to start the pin into the hole. Seems like a third hand would be nice here for this process. But with a little tongue waggling, a few choice words, and a bit of patience I was able to get it to fit.

Once I was able to get it aligned into the hole, then it was just a simple matter of making sure the pin was flush with the receiver. Then voila, the change was complete!

All in all I would give the Wheeler Trigger Guard Install Tool a 4.75 stars. And the only reason I’m not giving 5 stars is due to the fact that holding all the components and trying to get it aligned was not an easy task.
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How much ammo in your bug out bag?

ammoI have always believed that when it comes to bugging out, (click the link to learn about when it’s time to bug out) speed is your friend. I have written articles in the past stressing the need to keep your Bug out bag/Get home bag, light weight. The faster you get to your destination, the safer you will be.

When it comes to bags, you may have heard of the old adage, ounces = pounds, pounds = pain. Because of this, I tell folks to strip away a lot of the unnecessary accessories they have packed in their BOB. This includes bulk ammunition. Sometimes this notion has be met with a little opposition.

Many preppers out there believe that being prepared also means being able to adequately defend themselves. They argue that it stands to reason that they may find themselves in a situation where they need to be armed with the ability to adequately fight back. Hence they need plenty of ammo. And in some cases, I certainly agree.

But I also believe that bugging out with an ammo stockpile could, in many situations, cause you more harm than good.

8g6oeeHuh?

Let me explain.

Travel Light

The main purpose of your bag, be it a Go bag, Get Home bag, Bug Out Bag, etc  is to be able to move safely and efficiently out of a danger zone. In a SHTF situation, you are most vulnerable while on the move. And I’m not talking about roving bands of marauders that so many people envision. I’m talking about being susceptible to the elements, to fatigue, to stress; being vulnerable to the unknown. Those will most likely be your enemies early on.
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Preparing for the Election – Resources Guide

2nd-amendmentWith the elections just weeks away, I wanted to give some resources for those of you who might be preparing for the results of this year’s election. I also wanted to give you something to think about if you have not yet thought about preparing for it.

When I first put this site together, I told myself that I would not delve into politics. To me, preparedness transcends political and ideological belief. But I cannot hold my tongue any longer when I see our country’s freedoms being stripped away. I feel like if I don’t say/do something and instead remain silent, I am complicit with it happening.

So I have begun to speak out.

I’m not going to sit here and tell you who you should vote for. I truly believe that most people already know who they plan on voting for. If you are an informed voter, then you should already know where the candidates stand on issues like the 2nd Amendment.

I had a discussion with a more left leaning co-worker the other day. He told me that every time a Democratic president gets elected, gun sales spike. Then it calms down and then nothing really happens. Hence gun owners have nothing to panic over.

This has been true in the past. This time however, I think things are different.

I chuckled a bit, and mentioned that in July, Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey banned “Assault Weapons” in her state. No congressional debate. No vote of the people. She simply banned them. So don’t think for a second that it could not happen in your state, or worse on a national level.

He asked me the question so typical of anti-gun folks, “Why do you need an AR? All it is good for is killing people.”
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EDC Gun Review – Glock Compact

Glock 23, prepper firearms

Glock 23 with Streamlight TLR-2 tactical light. Click pic for more details

I had someone email me the other day, asking why I didn’t do a review of the Glock I carry as an EDC firearm. While I don’t carry a Glock off duty, I am sure there are plenty of folks out there who might carry it as their EDC gun.

And since I carry the Glock 23 on duty and have for over a decade, I figured I am somewhat qualified to review it. So, here you go! My review of a Glock as an EDC.

I will actually be looking at two compact (mid-sized) Glocks. I will look at the Glock 23 (.40 S&W) and the Glock 32 (.357 Sig.) The Glock 23 is a Gen 4, while the Glock 32 is a Gen 3.

The first Glocks were produced in 1982, and started arriving in the US by 1988. There was a lot of doubt in the “gun world” about whether a plastic (polymer) firearm was worth anything. The huge success of Glock has answered it’s critics. It is now one of the most popular handguns in America today. According to Glock’s website, 65% of police departments in the US issue/carry Glock pistols.

This success was partly due to the clever and effective marketing of Glock, who sold their pistols to the police at a discount. When police departments saw how effective and well-built the Glocks were, plus the fact that Glock 17s could hold 17 rounds of 9mm, they began carrying them en-mass. This gave credence to Glock with the general public, and the rest as they say is history.

The Glock 23/32 is a polymer framed pistol and almost 7 inches in length. (5 inches high.) Its 4 inch barrel is made of ordnance grade steel, and has a nitrate finish. The pistol (Glock 23) weighs about 23.5 oz or so (unloaded). The 32 weighs 21.5 oz unloaded.
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